Oh Dough!

I love Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds. I buy all my seeds from them for my garden. So when they came out with sour dough starter… I was intrigued.

OLD WORLD SOURDOUGH STARTER

“This highly effective dehydrated sourdough starter originated in a remote mountain village in Tajikistan. It’s the perfect choice for self-reliant homesteaders and home bakers alike, freeing you from the need for store-bought yeast. We hope you love this starter as much as we do. Each packet holds 1 tablespoon or more of the dehydrated starter. This is plenty to make a rehydrated starter that can be used and lasts for years if kept fed. (Some starters are reported to be over 500 years old.) Along with the starter are instructions on how to use and care for it.”

So naturally when I went to order, it was sold out. However, I checked back a couple days later and it was in stock. $10.95 with free shipping and a couple days later, I started on my sour dough journey.

Sourdough starter rising.

I followed the instructions included in the pack. I was meticulous. To my dismay, when the instructions said it should be ready… it wasn’t. My bread came out hard and a rock and dense as could be.

I did not give up.

I waited another day and like magic, the starter doubled after it’s next feeding. I followed a different recipe this time. Feasting at Home does a very detailed description of her process. I used her measurements, but I used my stand mixer to bring it all together. Look at this beautiful loaf.

My only disappointment is that I didn’t make more because this one went so fast. Tonight I will make another.

Fiber Series: Part One

Almost a year ago, The Juju Paradise brought our Angora goats home. My mom and I love yarn crafts. So naturally, we found angoras to be the perfect compliment to our little paradise in Santa Cruz. I did a ton of research, but I would never have guessed that these beautiful creatures would blend so well into our farm. They are almost like dogs in behavior, and are incredibly charming. It gets better, two times a year I get this beautiful raw, luxurious fiber called mohair- think “electric boots, a mohair suit”.

Both durable and resilient, mohair is notable for its high luster and sheen,[1] and is often used in fiber blends to add these qualities to a textile. Mohair takes dye exceptionally well. It feels warm in winter as it has excellent insulating properties, while its moisture-wicking properties allow it to remain cool in summer. It is durable, naturally elastic, flame-resistant and crease-resistant. It is considered a luxury fiber, like cashmere, angora, and silk, and can be more expensive than most sheep’s wool.

The ever reliable Wikipedia.
Before: Kendy with her newborn Genie.
After: Kendy with 5 month old Genie

It was daunting to learn. I read so much information from angora goat owners from farms all over the county. The biggest lesson I learned was to take all this information and adapt it to fit the needs of your farm; some farms raise these goats for their locks, some send it to a mill for processing, some do it all at home. Because processing times take a year (sometimes longer) I decided to learn how to process mohair.

So off I went, from shearing to washing to carding, I am learning a lot. I am positive I am doing something “wrong”. There are so many different farmers and so many ways to do this, I learned to do what works for me and learn along the way.

Join me on this journey to see how I take goat hair and make it into beautiful carded batts of 100% mohair.

Our Vegetable Garden 2019

This season has been tough on my garden. It was relatively cold for most of the Summer. Nevertheless, we got some good yield from our Summer 2019 Garden:

Lavender

Sweet mint

Peppermint

Okra

Tomato’s- 6 heirlooms, 4 hybrids

Yellow squash

Onions

Garlic (already harvested)

Leek

Cucumber

Pickling cucumber

Brussel sprouts (Pierson wasn’t quite sure about what it was).

Kale

Eggplant

Watermelon

Asparagus

Unfortunately, I had to battle the birds ALL SEASON LONG. It was frustrating. My favorite part of the Garden was the garlic. We harvested 75 bulbs and have them all dried.

A-Frame Tiny Cabin in 30 Days

Deek Diedricksen’s Transforming A-Frame Getaway Cabin

Building a modified version of Deek Diedricksen’s Transforming A-Frame Getaway Cabin. Father-daughter Team Cal & Sabrina doubled the size of the cabin and added a 220 square foot deck. Cabin has a huge swing door that is great for stargazing and opens with help of gas struts. Complete with a tiny fridge and freezer, sofa bed, and sink.

www.thejujuparadise.com to visit via Airbnb.

The first photo was taken on May 11, 2019 and this video was uploaded June 13, 2019- so overall it took us approximately one month to complete. We also built an outhouse in this time, but that was not videoed. We spent approximately $3000 to completely build and furnish, using the redwood milled from our property.

Please contact me if you would like to use these pictures or for questions about the build. Do not reproduce without my permission.

Here is a link to a time lapse video we created.

 

Here are some pictures of the completed project:

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